Knowledge and processes that predict proficiency in digital literacy

I recently read “Knowledge and processes that predict proficiency in digital literacy”. Written by Bulger, Monica E., Richard E. Mayer, and Miriam J. Metzger. (Reading and Writing (2014): 1-17), it is the write up of a research endeavor designed to determine what knowledge and activities can be used to predict a person’s digital literacy. The sort […] → Continue Reading Knowledge and processes that predict proficiency in digital literacy

Insights from Marta Newhart – Part 1

Many of us wish we could channel the knowledge and wisdom of the people that have [gone through the experience we] achieved all or some of the things we aspire to accomplish. To be able to know how they arrived there. To learn about the challenges they faced and learn how to overcome them. To learn […] → Continue Reading Insights from Marta Newhart – Part 1

And The Title Is….

I was invited to recite a spoken word piece at the Information School’s (iSchool) (University of Washington) Diversity Summit. After several iterations and feedback from friend in New York I finally had a finished poem. On Friday May 2, 2014 I had the pleasure of closing out the iSchool’s Diversity Summit with the spoken word piece I […] → Continue Reading And The Title Is….

Is That All You Need To Make An Impact?

Have you been trying to have a positive impact in peoples lives? Ever wonder about what it means to have an impact? This was topic of a presentation by Johnathan Grudin’s. Grudin is a renowned researcher at Microsoft Research, an instructor at the University of Washington’s iSchool, and the recipient of the 2014 inaugural CSCW Lasting […] → Continue Reading Is That All You Need To Make An Impact?

“R”eady for “R”

What is “R”? If you guessed, “a letter in the alphabet, d’oh!” 😀   You were right and on family feud that probably would have been the number one answer. But the letter “R” also represents a programming language typically used by people to compile statistics and analyze or create visual representations of a data set. […] → Continue Reading “R”eady for “R”

Programming Languages

Which programming language should a librarian learn first?

Over the last few years many librarian have probably asked themselves “What programming language should I learn first?” If you haven’t you probably should! What is at stake? Probably your job (e.g. librarian, archivist, cataloger). Why? Because information science professionals are being expected to have some level programming knowledge. Yes even for some non-technical jobs. […] → Continue Reading Which programming language should a librarian learn first?

Tools for the Exceptional Instructional Librarian

#ALAMW13’s session sponsored by the Library and Information Technology Association consisted of a lively discussion among practitioners about tools they use to enhance the student experience and do their jobs better. I hope you find my summary and the resources mentioned useful in your day-to-day work. What tools can I use to conduct live virtual […] → Continue Reading Tools for the Exceptional Instructional Librarian

Tips to Keep an Online Teaching Assistant On Track

This past quarter (Fall 2012) I had the opportunity to complete my first ever teaching assistantship online. It was in LIS570, a research methods course at the University of Washington’s Information School. It provided me with many great lessons as the relate to teaching online. I walked away at the end of the quarter with […] → Continue Reading Tips to Keep an Online Teaching Assistant On Track

Meebo Messenger is Shutting Down, Now What?

If you were using Meebo for chat reference at your library or to offer customers with online support this post is for you. Effective July 11, 2012, Google will shutdown (decommission) Meebo (click here to read more). If you have depended on Meebo you are probably looking for a replacement. Below you will find a […] → Continue Reading Meebo Messenger is Shutting Down, Now What?

Wasting Time is New Divide in Digital Era — A Response

NOTE: This post is a response to the ideas expressed in Matt Richtel’s New York Times piece, “Wasting Time is New Divide in Digital Era” and not necessarily a critique to the article itself. The article opens by describing the phenomena as an “unintended” “surprising” and “troubling” side effect of technology. I don’t know about you, […] → Continue Reading Wasting Time is New Divide in Digital Era — A Response